JUPITER IMPACT PAGE TWO

JUPITER'S IMPACT CLOUD EXPANDS: Jupiter's impact cloud is expanding. On July 19th, when it was discovered by amateur astronomer Anthony Wesley, the dark mark near Jupiter's south pole was barely visible in backyard telescopes. Five days later Wesley photographed the impact cloud again and found that it had approximately tripled in size: High-resolution images from the Hubble Space Telescope reveal what's happening: turbulence and jet streams in Jupiter's atmosphere are causing the cloud to spread out. The vast impact site is now tens of thousands of times wider than the 100m-class comet or asteroid that created it.  The expansion of the cloud makes it easier than ever to see through a backyard telescope: sky map. The cloud is located near Jupiter's System II longitude 210. For the predicted times when it will cross the planet's central meridian, add 2 hours and 6 minutes to Sky and Telescope's predicted transit times for Jupiter's Great Red Spot.

JUPITER UPDATE: Something interesting is happening to the dark impact mark on Jupiter. Not only is it growing larger, but also "it seems to be developing two lobes," says amateur astronomer Mike Hood, who sends this picture taken July 28th from his backyard observatory in Kathleen, Georgia: The same result has been obtained by astrophotographer Raffaello Lena of Rome, Italy. "On July 27th, the Jupiter impact site had evolved and now contains two condensed nucleii," he says. These changes are a likely result of dynamics in Jupiter's upper atmosphere. High-resolution images from the Hubble Space Telescope show that the impact cloud is being molded by high-altitude winds and turbulence. On a planet where vortices are ubiquitous, it is no surprise that a cloud would organize itself into two or more swirling spots.  Amateur astronomers are encouraged to continue monitoring Jupiter: sky map. The cloud is located near Jupiter's System II longitude 210. For the predicted times when it will cross the planet's central meridian, add 2 hours and 6 minutes to Sky and Telescope's predicted transit times for Jupiter's Great Red Spot. more images: from Sid Leach of Scottsdale, Arizona; from Tamas Ladanyi of Bakonykoppany, Hungary; from Efrain Morales Rivera of Aguadilla, Puerto Rico

SS: this impact at the south pole may answer the question why nearly all sungrazers that plunge the sun do so from the south pole .. it appears that the orbits of comets can be caught in an orbit similiar to the SL9 orbit in which the comet passes over the north pole of the sun and loops way out and comes back and plunges into the south pole .. we have seen this phenomena with some long period comets such as West and McNaught that sungrazed really close to the sun .. these long period comets likely followed an orbit similiar SL9 in which they passed through the solar system over the north pole of the sun, like Hale-Bopp passed over the north pole of the sun, and looped way out to return and sungraze the sun with a very close solar passage .. this means that Hale-Bopp will likely return and follow a very close solar sungraze path like West and McNaught during it's next trip to the inner solar system ..

SS: following this logic that most sungrazers plunge the sun at south pole it seems obvious that this was a comet following a cometary sungrazer-like orbit into south pole of jupiter ..