CME + G2 Geomagnetic Storm Cause Volcano Eruption + Earthquake

SS: A CME from the sun caused a G2 geomagnetic storm .. this geomagnetic storm interacts with the earth magnetic field .. the earth's magnetic field is projected by the earth's core .. these geomagnetic storms heat the earth's core similar to induction .. when the earth's core heats then magma expands .. therefore, as recorded in my archives, we see an increase in volcanic activity during solar maximums and heavy geomagnetic activity . in this particular case the iceland volcano has erupted a second time with even more force .

SS: a comet was observed to fragment near the polestar Vega on the 15th of April .. this volcano erupted for second time on the 14th of April .. it seems this comet coincides with the second eruption of this volcano .. the first eruption coincided with a fragmented comet near the polestar Thuban on 19th of March .

First Iceland Volcano Eruption

NORTHERN LIGHTS IN THE USA: On Saturday, April 11th, a coronal mass ejection (CME) hit Earth's magnetic field. The impact caused a G2-class geomagnetic storm and, for the first time this year, ignited auroras over the continental United States. "The lights were bright enough to produce a reflection from the surface of Lake Superior," says photographer Shawn Malone, who recorded the scene from a beach in Marquette, Michigan: Northern Lights were also spotted in Maine, Vermont, Wisonsin and Minnesota. Mostly the lights were dim and required a photographic exposure of some tens of seconds for full effect. Nevertheless, they were there. "Lower 48" sightings of auroras are a sign: The deep solar minimum of 2008-2009 has come to an end and a new solar cycle is gaining strength. If forecasters are correct, Solar Max is just two to three years away. Are you ready?

Iceland evacuates hundreds as volcano erupts again April 14, 2010 35 mins ago REYKJAVIK, Iceland A volcano under a glacier in Iceland erupted Wednesday for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air, closing a major road and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the Eyjafjallajokull glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet (3 meters). Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding. "This is a very much more violent eruption, because it's interacting with ice and water," said Andy Russell, an expert in glacial flooding at the University of Newcastle in northern England. "It becomes much more explosive, instead of a nice lava flow oozing out of the ground." Rognvaldur Olafsson, a chief inspector for the Icelandic Civil Protection Agency, said no lives or properties were in immediate danger. Scientists said there was no sign of increased activity at the much larger Katla volcano nearby. The agency said commercial aircraft had reported seeing steam plumes rising thousands of feet (meters) into the air. Scientists aboard a Coast Guard plane that flew over the volcano said the new fissure appeared to be up to 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) long. There were no immediate signs of large clouds of volcanic ash, which could disrupt air travel between Europe and North America. Some domestic flights were canceled, but Iceland's international airport remained open. The volcano, about 75 miles (120 kilometers) east of Reykjavik, erupted March 20 after almost 200 years of silence.

The original eruption petered out earlier this week. But Gunnar Gudmunsson, a geophysicist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, said there were a series of tremors overnight, and rivers in the area began rising Wednesday morning strong evidence of a new eruption under the glacier. Last month's eruption struck near the glacier in an area that had no ice. Gudmunsson said the new eruption appeared to be about eight or nine kilometers (five to six miles) west of the original fissure. "Most probably this eruption is taking place at the summit ... under the ice," he said. Pall Einarsson, a geophysicist at the University of Iceland, said magma was melting a hole in the 650-foot (200 meter) thick ice covering the volcano's crater, sending floodwater coursing down the glacier into lowland areas.

In this image made available by the Icelandic Coastguard, Wednesday April 14, 2010, smoke and steam rises from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet (3 meters). Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.
(AP Photo/Icelandic Coastguard, ho)

SS: we have an earthquake on the opposite side of the planet .. magma rushing up from the deep earth causes vortexes of energy thus at it rushes violently up from the deep earth it pushes vortexes of energy on the opposite side of the planet .. we have seen this same phenomena during the mount etna super eruptions during the last solar maximum in which massive waves where detected on the opposite side of the planet . these vortexes will also cause a warp of the earth's magnetosphere bringing with it strange weather patterns . an intensification of the Schumann resonance is also expected . i think this activity is a reacion to the recent harmonics weapons activity in combination with the G2 geomagnetic storm .  

Magnitude 6.9 earthquake strikes Tibetan plateau Tue Apr 13, 8:46 pm ET BEIJING (Reuters) A magnitude 6.9 earthquake hit a remote region of the Tibetan plateau in China, the United States Geological Survey said on Wednesday. There were no immediate reports of damage or casualties from the area, in the mountains that divide Qinghai province from the Tibet Autonomous Region. The quake was centered 150 miles north northwest of Qamdo in Tibet and 235 miles south southeast of the mining town of Golmud in Qinghai, and had a depth of 29 miles, it said. The foothills to the south and east of the area are home to herders and Tibetan monastaries, while the area to the north and west is arid and desolate. A magnitude 5.0 quake struck the same region late on Tuesday night. The plateau is regularly shaken by earthquakes, but casualties are usually minimal because so few people live there. The exception was the magnitude-8 quake that hit the Sichuan foothills in May 2008, killing 80,000 people.

In this image taken from TV Wednesday April 14, 2010, shows smoke rising from the crater of the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet (3 meters). Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.
(AP Photo/CH2 TV, via APTN) ** TV OUT ICELAND OUT **

In this image taken from TV Wednesday April 14, 2010, shows smoke rising from the crater of the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet (3 meters). Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.
(AP Photo/CH2 TV, via APTN) ** TV OUT ICELAND OUT **

Smoke billows from a volcano in Eyjafjallajokull April 14, 2010. A volcanic eruption in Iceland spewed black smoke and white steam into the air on Wednesday and partly melted a glacier, setting off a major flood that threatened to damage roads and bridges.
REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson (ICELAND - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)

Smoke billows from a volcano in Eyjafjallajokull April 14, 2010. A volcanic eruption in Iceland spewed black smoke and white steam into the air on Wednesday and partly melted a glacier, setting off a major flood that threatened to damage roads and bridges.
REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson (ICELAND - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT

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