Q3 Siding Spring Fragments Near Polestar Thuban

Comet's split caught in the act Posted: 19 March On Wednesday Astronomy Now's Nick Howes revealed images that suggest Comet C2007 Q3 Siding Spring is in the process of breaking up. We can now confirm that this is a fragmentation event, and catch up with Nick after his latest stint on the Faulkes Telescope. “The secondary piece just into the tail in the picture is probably a small fragment or clump of fragments thrown off the main body several days earlier," says top comet scientist Professor Michael Combi from the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences at the University of Michgan. "It should continue to drift down the tail and probably fade compared with the main comet itself."

Thuban was the polestar during the period in which the egyptian and mayan pyramids were built .. the main pyramids of Giza there are two shafts, one is aligned with the polestar thuban and the other is aligned with the three belt stars in Orion .

The three polestars:

Thuban: past polestar represents non-polarized vortexes of energy

Polaris: present polestar represent polarized energy

Vega: future polestar represents consciousness

" As Above So Below "

23 - 25 March 2010 Q3 Siding Spring continues Fragments Near Thuban

SS: As the comet outburst causing massive x-rays near Thuban flipping the springs at the quantum level causing a new vortex of energy ( Saclar Oscillation ) to begin to oscillate in the etheric a non-polarized vortex of geomagnetic energy arose from the earth in a volcanic eruption at iceland:

21 Mar 2010 Eyjafjallajokull Volcano Eruption

The Eyjafjallajokull volcano erupts in southern Iceland early March 21, 2010. The volcano erupted overnight, forcing hundreds of people to evacuate the area and diverting flights after authorities declared a local state of emergency, officials said on Sunday.
REUTERS/Ragnar Axelsson

The Eyjafjallajokull volcano erupts in southern Iceland early March 21, 2010. The volcano erupted overnight, forcing hundreds of people to evacuate the area and diverting flights after authorities declared a local state of emergency, officials said on Sunday. REUTERS/Ragnar Axelsson (ICELAND - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)

In this aerial photo, showing molten lava as it vents from a rupture near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, as a volcano erupts early Sunday March 21, 2010. Some hundreds of people have been evacuated from a small nearby village in southern Iceland on Sunday after a volcanic eruption which shot ash and molten lava into the air, the first major eruption here in nearly 200-years.
(AP Photo/Ragnar Axelsson )

Smoke rises from the site of a volcanic eruption behind the Eyjafjallajoekull glacier, some125 kilometres (75 miles) east of Iceland's capital Reykjavik. A small volcano eruption that forced more than 600 people to flee their homes in Iceland over the weekend could conceivably set off a larger volcano, experts warned Monday.
(AFP/Halldor Kolbeins)

Iceland's first volcanic eruption in six years forced 600 people to flee their homes and brought a halt to all flights into and out of the Nordic island nation. (AFP/Graphics)

Satellites Providing Rapid Estimates Of Iceland Volcano Emissions

Posted on: Thursday, 8 April 2010, 08:14 CDT A NASA research team is using the latest advances in satellite artificial intelligence to speed up estimates of the heat and volume of lava escaping from an erupting volcano in Iceland.

On March 20, 2010, Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano (pronounced "AYA-feeyapla-yurkul,") awakened for the first time in 120 years, spewing still-active lava fountains and flows. That day, a NASA "sensor web" -- a network of sensors on the ground and aboard NASA's Earth Observing-1 satellite, alerted researchers to this new volcanic "hot spot." The eruption was detected by autonomous "sciencecraft" software aboard the satellite, which is known as EO-1.

Less than 24 hours after the satellite's first observation, the JPL team confirmed the volcano was emitting more than one billion watts of energy -- enough to power 40,000 passenger cars at the same time -- and discharging more than six tons of lava per second.

THE ACTION IN ICELAND: Sometimes both heaven and Earth erupt. Such was the case on April 4th when an outburst of auroras met an outburst of lava in southern Iceland: Kristinn R. Kristinsson took the picture from a glacier overlooking Iceland's active Eyjafjallajökull volcano. The volcano erupted on March 20th for the first time in 190 years--and it has been spewing lava and attracting sightseers ever since. Even Top Gear is filming an episode there. On April 4th a solar wind gust hit Earth and ignited auroras almost directly above the lava flow. Kristinsson was in the right place at the right time to see the display. April 4th marked the beginning of a major solar wind storm, which is only now subsiding. The four-day event brought auroras to the lava fields of Iceland, created a kaleidoscopic display of moving color over Antarctica, and lured onlookers in Siberia outdoors for a quick "aurora dance." Really. Browse the gallery for photos.