SS: we can now see that what i have been saying my theory about the deep red auroras all the way south to texas we would see an increase in volcanic activity is being proven truth. i already knew this from the previous solar maximum .. these congo volcanos are fairly active and usually stay in eruption about two weeks to a month if i remember right which i will soon since i have the all the previous eruptions archived which i will make some blogs of them soon. i think forgot to mention that this is “SECRET ORDER” theory.

SS: underneath africa is a huge gigantic superplume .. it is so big that it causes a warpage of the magnetosphere at one place . so when we see el hiero in eruption and then goma volcano go at same time then we are confired an expansion of magma as the superplume under africa is expanding from the heating of the earth’s core by the solar activity . as you can read below when the earths core is heated it causes magma to grow superplumes to grow .

Many versions of the Twin Myth must have circulated among the Mayas, but the only one that survives in a written form is the Classical K’iche’ version in the Popol Vuh. According to this version, the Hero Twins were Xbalanque and Hunahpu (Modern K’iche’: Xb‘alanke and Junajpu) The Egypto-Atlantean Bomb and its Radiation Danger.


Great African Plume Emerges as a Tectonic Player Geophysicists have long suspected that Earth might have another, less obvious way of chilling out. Almost 3000 kilometers down at the bottom of the mantle, they figured, heat from the molten iron core may churn up towering plumes of hot rock that slowly rise to the surface to spew volcanic outpourings. A narrow plume has recently been spied beneath Iceland (Science, 14 May, p. 1095), and another may fuel Hawaii’s volcanoes–small potatoes in Earth’s cooling system. But geophysicists are now accumulating increasing evidence of two huge “superplumes” cooling the core. Superplumes loft heat from Earth’s core, while cold slabs sink inward.

El Hierro Still Churning the Sea The submarine volcanic eruption that began in mid-October in the Canary Islands continued in early November 2011. The volcanic island of El Hierro sits on a tectonic hot spot in the Atlantic Ocean off of North Africa and Spain. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite acquired this natural-color image of El Hierro and a plume of volcanic material in the surrounding waters on November 2, 2011. The waters south of the island have been bubbling and fizzing with heat, sediment, bits of volcanic rock, and minerals for weeks, with the plume stretching tens of kilometers.

An eruption is seen from Nyamulagira volcano, 22 km (14 miles) from the city of Goma, in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo November 6, 2011. The eruption appears to be on a lower section of the volcano, or in a separate caldera, with lava flowing north into a non-populated section of the park. Picture taken November 6, 2011. REUTERS/Kenny Katombe (DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO – Tags: ENVIRONMENT)

This photo was taken on November 4, 2011 in La Restinga Canary Islands By Presidencia del Gobierno de Canarias This photo was taken on November 4, 2011 in La Restinga Canary Islands By Presidencia del Gobierno de Canarias This photo was taken on November 4, 2011 in La Restinga Canary Islands By Presidencia del Gobierno de Canarias