In this photo taken Friday, Nov. 25, 2011, Cape vultures hover over a “vulture restaurant” at the Vulture Programme at Boekenhoutkloof near Hartbeespoort Dam, South Africa. Cape vultures, with its 2.6 meter (8 and a half foot) wingspan, are seen as spectacular fliers. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

In this photo taken Friday, Nov. 25, 2011, a Cape vulture hovers over a “vulture restaurant” at the Vulture Programme at Boekenhoutkloof near Hartbeespoort Dam, South Africa. Cape vultures, with its 2.6 meter (8 and a half foot) wingspan, are seen as spectacular fliers. (Photo/Denis Farrell)

In this photo taken Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2011, an artificially hatched chick is cared for by its parent at the Vulture Programme at Boekenhoutkloof near Hartbeespoort Dam, South Africa. To ensure as many successful hatchings as possible, eggs are removed from breeding adult pairs, soon after they are laid and replaced with wooden dummies. Hours are spent painstakingly chipping away at the shell using a syringe to dampen the feathers of the emerging bird with a solution resembling a mother bird’s saliva. In the wild, when overeager parents hatch their chicks too fast, the chicks can die of shock. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)


In this photo taken Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2011, researcher Kerri Wolter, unseen, hatches a Cape vulture’s egg at the Vulture Programme at Boekenhoutkloof near Hartbeespoort Dam, South Africa. To ensure as many successful hatchings as possible, Wolter and partner Walter Neser remove the eggs from adult pairs, soon after they are laid and replace them with wooden dummies. Wolter spends hours painstakingly chipping away at the shell using a syringe to dampen the feathers of the emerging bird with a solution resembling a mother bird’s saliva. In the wild, when overeager parents hatch their chicks too fast, the chicks can die of shock. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

In this photo taken Wednesday, June 22, 2011, a Cape vulture, right, and a pied crow, left, await in a nearby tree to feed on a carcass of a pig at a “vulture restaurant” at Mogale’s Gate Reserve near Krugersdorp, South Africa. The feeding point is created to keep the vultures from ranging far in search of food and perhaps finding poisoned offerings as well as creating spots where visitors can experience some of the bird’s eating habits. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

In this photo taken Friday, Nov. 25, 2011, Cape vultures hover over a “vulture restaurant” at the Vulture Programme at Boekenhoutkloof near Hartbeespoort Dam, South Africa. Cape vultures, with its 2.6 meter (8 and a half foot) wingspan, are seen as spectacular fliers. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

In this photo taken Friday, Nov. 25, 2011, Cape vultures gather by carcasses at a “vulture restaurant” at the Vulture Programme at Boekenhoutkloof near Hartbeespoort Dam, South Africa. The birds are known as loyal mates, devoted parents and resourceful foragers, as well as spectacular flyers. Visitors to the Vulture Programme can observe the birds feeding at a “vulture restaurant” and get close to a Cape vulture breeding colony established on an artificial cliff built of concrete, mesh and paint. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)