b14f0363-de19-4f79-b26d-d94e7bd5d2d4_SVbC_KogBMVlsIsfDVYWd-W8w-qbeUlYb4mCv3wnJL6eZtOVgvLDauaQVXgyhvJSL3jBpdyJ1B4-_1_0 (1)

The fin of an albino killer whale nicknamed Iceberg travelling in a pod of 13 orcas near Bering island in the Commander islands in Russia. A team of Russian scientists say they will embark on a quest next week to observe the only all-white, adult killer whale ever spotted — a majestic and elusive bull they have named Iceberg. (AFP Photo/E.Lazareva)

In late August and early September 2014, the Far East Russia Orca Project (FEROP) was surveying the southeastern coast of Kamchatka and Northern Kuril Islands, in Russia, as part of a humpback whale project. In the Fourth Kuril Strait, between Onekotan and Paramushir islands, they met a large group of orcas and began photographing them for photo-IDs. The fog thickened soon after and visibility dropped to less than 100 meters, so the team stopped to listen for sounds. Suddenly a group of orcas approached, and right next to the boat, a rare white orca surfaced, likely a juvenile. The FEROP team soon lost the white whale in the fog, but the image was fixed in mind and in this piece of video! Scientists had previously only recorded one other white orca in history! Credit to FEROP.

A killer whale swims in 2007. A team of Russian scientists say they will embark on a quest next week to observe the only all-white, adult killer whale ever spotted — a majestic and elusive bull they have named Iceberg. (AFP Photo/Marcel Mochet)

04-24-12000_ARP1875666