SS: we can see that the priestess does originate as egyptian . so the greek priestess does trace it’s origin back to the ISIS egyptian moon goddess .. if we recall the greek artifacts have ISIS inscribed upon it. some these priestess were called “Singer of Atum” and “Enchantress of Atum” who wears the tall feather crown and who were all the way to greece. these egyptian gods and goddess were known to have multiple ka’s or souls .. which my priestess has both “Singer of Amun” and “Enchantress of Amun” .

SS: Henutmehyt also called the “Enchantress of Amun” her crossed arms identifies her with Osiris that she follows path of the pharoahs . on the coffin the “eyes of wadjet” identifies with the goddess isis and also cat goddess bast of the cult of amon the “singers of amun” . they then call her “Queen of the Goddesses” when she becomes multiple ensouled goddess. isis-henutmehyt-ixchell-bast would be a multiple ensouled goddess . ix-chell being the mayan bast & henutmehyt egyptian isis. .. i think the “Enchantress of Amun” is probably an actress .

Henutmehyt The excessive use of gold, and the high quality and detail of her coffin indicates that Henutmehyt was a wealthy woman. On the front of the coffin we can recognize the figures of Isis and Nephthys, the protectors of the deceased.

Gilded outer coffin of Henutmehyt The physical form, with crossed arms, together with the inscriptions and the figures of protective gods and goddesses all emphasized the identification of the dead person with the god Osiris. The implication was that, like him, they might experience resurrection.

Henutmehyt’s outer coffin provides a magnificent idealized image of the dead woman, adorned with her full wig. A collar is spread over the breast, and below it hangs a pectoral (chest) ornament flanked by protective wedjat eyes. The sky-goddess Nut spreads her winged arms protectively across the body, and the hieroglyphic text immediately below invokes her.

The world’s largest book of the dead has gone on show at a major new exhibition opening this week at the British Museum in London. Duration: 01: 54(AFPTV) The world’s largest book of the dead has gone on show at a major new exhibition opening this week at the British Museum in London. Duration: 01: 54(AFPTV)

Egyptian deity Osiris, left, is adored by a scribe, Nakht and his wife Tjuyu, in an illustration inked onto a papyrus scroll, dating to the late 18th or 19th dynasty, (about 1350 BC), as part of a new exhibition at the British Museum in London, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010. The exhibition brings together treasures from the museum’s collection of Egyptian artifacts, including fragile papyrus scrolls that are rarely shown in public. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

A man looks at the coffin of Thebian priestess Henutmehyt, from the 19th Dynasty (around 1250 BC), at the British Museum in London, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010. The exhibition brings together treasures from the museum’s collection of Egyptian artifacts, including fragile papyrus scrolls that are rarely shown in public. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)