04-29-14solar_eclipse01

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2014-04-24T014718Z_64589583_GM1EA4O00IH01_RTRMADP_3_SCIENCE-ICEBERG

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SS: an eclipse has happened in the aries zero point node .. it is called the zero point because it is the first point in the ecliptic which the sun and moon travel. zero point is also hyperdimensional etheric as in scalar physics the “zero point vaccum” is NO SPACE NO TIME in which the “scalar potential” vibrate.. aries is the altar in which the ram is sacrificed for it’s fleece. the siding spring comet is still in the furnace .

SS: 05-03-14 UPDATE: wanted to update this blog so that we can remember that this giant crucifix collapsed just days prior to this solar eclipse .. and to show the location of the k1 panstarrs comet swarm during the eclipse. we can see the k1 panstarrs comet is near the whirlpool galaxy during the eclipse .

That’s a bad sign: 100ft crucifix built in honour of John Paul II collapses and crushes a man to death just two days before he is declared a saint  24 April 2014 A young pilgrim has been crushed to death by a giant crucifix dedicated to Pope John Paul II. The 100ft curved wooden cross collapsed during a ceremony in northern Italy days before the former Pope’s canonisation. Marco Gusmini, 21, on a visit with other young Catholics to the Alpine village of Cevo, was killed instantly.

First Point of Aries The Zero Degree Aries Point What is the ZERO Degree Aries Point? The Aries point, or vernal equinox in the tropical zodiac, is a NODE. It marks the place where the sun crosses the equatorial plain going north. Think of it as a Sun/earth node, as opposed to the Lunar nodes which involve the Sun/earth/Moon).

Annular Solar Eclipse of April 29 The first solar eclipse of 2014 occurs at the Moon’s descending node in southern Aries. This particular eclipse is rather unusual because the central axis of the Moon’s antumbral shadow misses Earth entirely while the shadow edge grazes the planet. Classified as a non-central annular eclipse, such events are rare. Out of the 3,956 annular eclipses occurring during the 5,000-year period -2000 to +3000, only 68 of them or 1.7% are non-central (Espenak and Meeus, 2006).

A solar eclipse is shown in this multiple exposure sequence as seen from the Australian Antarctic Division’s Casey Station at Vincennes Bay in Antarctica in this picture taken April 29, 2014. An annular eclipse was visible from Antarctica and some areas in the southern Indian Ocean, with just a partial eclipse visible in Australia. It was one of just two solar eclipses in 2014. (REUTERS/Australian Antarctic Division)

The B-31 Iceberg is seen before separating from a rift in Antarctica’s Pine Island Glacier in this NASA Earth Observatory handout image acquired on October 28, 2013. Scientists are monitoring an unusually large iceberg – roughly six times the size of Manhattan – that broke off from an Antarctic glacier and is heading into the open ocean, although not in an area heavily navigated by ships. REUTERS/NASA Earth Observatory/Holli Riebeek/Handout via Reuters. (ANTARCTICA – Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENT)

The B-31 Iceberg is seen after separating from a rift in Antarctica’s Pine Island Glacier in this NASA Earth Observatory handout image acquired on November 13, 2013. Scientists are monitoring an unusually large iceberg – roughly six times the size of Manhattan – that broke off from an Antarctic glacier and is heading into the open ocean, although not in an area heavily navigated by ships. REUTERS/NASA Earth Observatory/Holli Riebeek/Handout via Reuters. (ANTARCTICA – Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

This combination of Dec. 10, 2013, left, and March 11, 2014 photos provided by NASA shows a large iceberg separating from the Pine Island Glacier and traveling across Pine Island Bay in Antarctica. Scientists are watching the iceberg, which is bigger than the island of Guam, as it slowly moves away from the glacier, bottom right in December, upper left center in March. NASA scientist Kelly Brunt said it is more a wonder than a worry and is not a threat to shipping or sea level rise. (AP Photo/NASA)

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