Archive for the ‘Archaeology’ Category

Of the Great Basin Winchester Rifle

Handout photo of a Winchester Model 1773 found by park workers in Great Basin National Park

A Winchester Model 1773 found by park workers in Great Basin National Park, Nevada, in November 2014, is shown in this handout photo provided by U.S. Park Services January 15, 2015. Archaeologists stumbled upon the 132-year old rifle, leaning against a tree while conducting a survey in the park, possibly having been left there more than a century ago.   REUTERS/U.S. Park Service/Handout via Reuters  (UNITED STATES – Tags: SOCIETY)

This image provided by the Great Basin National Park shows a Winchester Model 1873 rifle found in Nevada.  The gun made in 1882 was found propped against a juniper tree in Great Basin National Park in November during an archaeological survey.  Park spokeswoman Nichole Andler says officials may never know how long the rifle had been standing there, but it’s possible it had been left there in the 1880s.  (AP Photo/National Park Service)

Winchester Rifle Mystery

    Of the Pompei Valley in Huaraz, Peru Glaciers

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    The glacier Huascaran is seen in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    AP10ThingsToSee – Members of the glaciology unit of Peru’s national water authority walk on the Pastoruri glacier in Huaraz, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. The glaciology unit is studying the measurement of ice thickness. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    The Contrayerba glacier is seen in the Huascaran National Park in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    The glacier Contrayerba is seen in the Huascaran National Park in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    Members of the glaciology unit of Peru’s national water authority walk towards the Pastoruri glacier in Huaraz, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. The glaciology unit is studying the measurement of ice thickness. According to Alejo Cochachin, coordinator of the glaciology unit, the Pastoruri glacier retreated 576 meters between 1980 and 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    A member of the glaciology unit of Peru’s national water authority walks next to Pastoruri glacier after measuring its ice thickness, in Huaraz, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. According to Alejo Cochachin, coordinator of the glaciology unit, the Pastoruri glacier retreated 576 meters between 1980 and 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    Melting blocks of ice float near the Pastoruri glacier in Huaraz, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. According to Alejo Cochachin, coordinator of the glaciology unit, the Pastoruri glacier retreated 576 meters between 1980 and 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    The Vallunaraju mountain stands high in the Andes, early morning in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    Rain drops illuminated by the sun, fall over Pompei valley in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    A road winds its way through Pompei valley in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    The geoglyph of the condor is seen from a plane in Nazca, Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, “Time for Change: The Future is Renewable,” which can be viewed from the sky next to the hummingbird geoglyph, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the cultural landmarks of Peru. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    The geoglyph of the austronaut is seen from a plane in Nazca, Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, “Time for Change: The Future is Renewable,” which can be viewed from the sky next to the hummingbird geoglyph, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the cultural landmarks of Peru. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

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      Of the Macedonian Alexander the Great

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      A modern bronze statue of Alexander the Great on his famous horse Bucephalus, flanked by copies of round shields and the Macedonian infantry’s terrible Sarissa pike, stands under the cloudy sky of the northern port city of Thessaloniki, Greece, Oct, 8, 2014. Alexander the Great was one of history’s most successful military commanders, who by his death at age 33 had conquered an empire stretching from modern Greece to India. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

      A funerary mask and other gold jewelry excavated in a rich ancient Macedonian cemetery is seen in the archeological museum of Pella, northern Greece, on Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. The city of Pella was the Macedonians’ later capital, where the ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the Great was born in 356 B.C. Excavations in recent decades there have uncovered extensive building remains, a rich mosaic floor believed to depict Alexander during a lion hunt, and large cemeteries. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

      A visitor looks at a display of bronze armor and gold funerary masks and jewelry excavated in rich ancient Macedonian cemeteries at Aigai and Pella, in the archeological museum of Pella, northern Greece, on Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. The city of Pella was the Macedonians’ later capital, where the ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the Great was born in 356 B.C. Excavations in recent decades there have uncovered extensive building remains, a rich mosaic floor believed to depict Alexander during a lion hunt, and large cemeteries.(AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

      A schoolteacher explains the myth of Persephone in front of a replica of a mid-4th century B.C. wall painting of Hades abducting Persephone, whose original was found in a looted royal tomb, at the Vergina museum in northern Greece, Oct. 7, 2014. A similar scene has been discovered on a mosaic floor in a newly-excavated Macedonian tomb in Amphipolis, which has revived interest in ancient Greece’s Macedonian dynasties. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

      Ancient Macedonian silver coins inscribed in Greek “First of the Macedonians” and “Macedonians” are seen in a display case at the archeological museum of Pella, Greece, Oct. 7, 2014. The city of Pella was the Macedonians’ later capital, where the ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the Great was born in 356 B.C. Excavations in recent decades there have uncovered extensive building remains, a rich mosaic floor believed to depict Alexander during a lion hunt, and large cemeteries. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

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        Of the Pyramid of King Netjerykhet Djoser

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        Djoser was the first or second king of the 3rd Dynasty (ca. 2667 to 2648 BC) of the Egyptian Old Kingdom (ca. 2686 to 2125 BC).[1] He is believed to have ruled for 19 years or, if the 19 years were biennial taxation years, 38 years.[4] He reigned long enough to allow the grandiose plan for his pyramid to be realized in his lifetime.[5] Djoser is best known for his innovative tomb, which dominates the Saqqara landscape.[4] In this tomb he is referred to by his Horus name Netjerykhet; Djoser is a name given by New Kingdom visitors thousands of years later.[6]

        Netjerykhet (Djoser) in Tour Egypt Netjerikhet Djoser was the 2nd King of Egypt’s 3rd Dynasty, and was probably the most famous king during this period. He is also sometimes referred to as Zoser, and by the Greeks, Tesorthos. Through contemporary sources, he is only known by his Horus and Nebt-names, Netjerikhet, “the divine of body”. Djoser may have been the king’s birth name and appears only in later records. The earliest evidence that the two names belong to the same king is found on a long inscription on a large rock on the island of Sehel at Aswan. According to the Turin King list, Netjerikhet Djoser ruled for about 19 years, following the 20 year long reign of the otherwise unattested Nebka (Sanakhte).

        Birds fly above wooden scaffolding covering the Djoser Pyramid in Saqqara, Egypt, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The restoration of the 4,600-year old pyramid has prompted controversy between the Ministry of Antiquities, activists and archaeologists. (AP Photo/Samuel McNeil)

        Wooden scaffolding covers the Djoser Pyramid in Saqqara, Egypt, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The restoration of the 4,600-year old pyramid has prompted controversy between the Ministry of Antiquities, activists and archaeologists including the new brick work at the base of the pyramid. (AP Photo/Samuel McNeil)

        An Egyptian archeology worker stands at the gate of the temple of Saqqara that serves as an entrance to the Djoser Pyramid, 30 kilometers southwest of Cairo, in Saqqara, Egypt, Sept. 16, 2014. The restoration of the 4,600-year old pyramid has prompted controversy between the Ministry of Antiquities, activists and archaeologists. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

        An Egyptian farmer rides his donkey in front of Djoser Pyramid, 30 kilometers southwest of Cairo, in Saqqara, Egypt, Sept. 16, 2014. The restoration of the 4,600-year old pyramid has prompted controversy between the Ministry of Antiquities, activists and archaeologists. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

        Building materials gather dust at the foot of the Djoser Pyramid in Saqqara, Egypt, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The restoration of the 4,600-year old pyramid has prompted controversy between the Ministry of Antiquities, activists and archaeologists including the new brick work at the base of the pyramid. (AP Photo/Samuel McNeil)

        Egypt has recovered fragments from the pyramid of Cheops said to have been stolen by Germans, including part of a stone tablet identifying the pharaoh it was named after, state media report (AFP Photo/Cris Bouroncle)

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          Of the Great Pyramid at the Cahuachi

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          Tourists walk at the Great Pyramid at the Cahuachi Ceremonial Centre in Nazca September 13, 2014. Researchers say priests from the Cahuachi compound, built in 400 B.C., which is just across the Nazca Valley, may have designed the Nazca Lines, one of Peru’s popular tourist attractions and a UNESCO World Heritage site. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY TRAVEL)

          The Great Pyramid is seen at the Cahuachi Ceremonial Centre in Nazca September 13, 2014. Researchers say priests from the Cahuachi compound, built in 400 B.C., which is just across the Nazca Valley, may have designed the Nazca Lines, one of Peru’s popular tourist attractions and a UNESCO World Heritage site. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY TRAVEL)

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            Of the Huaca de la Luna Jaguar Claws

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            The Alto Madre de Dios river, part of the Manu Biosphere Reserve, is seen from Peru’s southern Amazon region of Madre de Dios July 15, 2014. This 1.8 million hectares reserve is the largest National Park in Peru and is the home of about 1000 birds species and 200 mammals species among other animals, as reptiles and amphibians, and has one of the highest levels of biodiversity of any park in the world, with more than 200 varieties of trees found in one hectare. Picture taken July 15, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU – Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY TRAVEL)

            A Jaguar is seen at the Manu National Park in Peru’s southern Amazon region of Madre de Dios July 16, 2014. This 1.8 million hectares reserve is the largest National Park in Peru and is the home of about 1000 birds species and 200 mammals species among other animals, as reptiles and amphibians, and has one of the highest levels of biodiversity of any park in the world, with more than 200 varieties of trees found in one hectare. Picture taken July 16, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU – Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS SOCIETY TRAVEL)

            An archaeologist shows a pair of metal claws found at a tomb from the Moche culture recently excavated at the Huaca de la Luna archaeological site in the city of Trujillo, July 10, 2014. Archaeologists in northern Peru have unearthed a pre-Incan tomb of a nobleman from the mysterious Moche civilisation that could be 1,500 years old, shedding new light on the ancient culture, according to archaeologist Santiago Uceda, director of the archaeological site. Picture taken July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Luis Alvitres (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY)

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              Of the Pyramids of the Sun and Moon and the Avenue of the Dead

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              An eclipse is called “chasing the dragon who swallows the Moon or the Sun.”. However, in the Nuttall Codex of the Mixteca, there may be another definition: “the dragon that swallowed the stars of the Milky Way and created the Road to Xibalba of the Underworld.”

              “In the pre-Columbian Andes, the Milky Way was styled a river (‘mayu’) or, less frequently, a road (nan). It was the route traveled by both the gods and the spirits of the dead in order to reach the world of the living.” (Sullivan, p.49)

              Tourists walk at the Avenue of the Dead near the Pyramid of the Sun (background, L) at the Teotihuacan archaeological site March 30, 2014. REUTERS/Russell Boyce (MEXICO – Tags: TRAVEL SOCIETY)

              Tourists climb the Pyramid of the Moon at the Teotihuacan archaeological site on the outskirts of Mexico City, March 30, 2014. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (MEXICO – Tags: SOCIETY TRAVEL)

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                Of the Pharaoh Amenhotep III and His Queen Tiye

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                Tourists and journalists walk past a newly displayed statue of pharaoh Amenhotep III in Egypt’s temple city of Luxor on March 23, 2014 (AFP Photo/Khaled Desouki)

                A statue of pharaoh Amenhotep III and his wife Tiye are unviled in Egypt’s temple city of Luxor on March 23, 2014 (AFP Photo/Khaled Desouki)

                A new statue of pharaoh Amenhotep III and his wife Tiye is unveiled in Egypt’s temple city of Luxor on March 23, 2014 (AFP Photo/Khaled Desouki)

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                  Of the Teotihuacan Pyramid of the Sun Spring Equinox

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                  A man looks at the Pyramid of the Sun during spring equinox celebrations at the Teotihuacan archeological site, in Mexico, Friday, March 21, 2014. Although the official vernal equinox occurred on Thursday, thousands of visitors were expected to climb the ancient pyramid on Friday to greet the sun and celebrate the beginning of spring. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

                  A hot air balloon rises alongside the Pyramid of the Sun shortly after sunrise, during spring equinox celebrations at the Teotihuacan archeological site, in Mexico, Friday, March 21, 2014. Although the official vernal equinox occurred on Thursday, thousands of visitors were expected to climb the ancient pyramid on Friday to greet the sun and celebrate the beginning of spring. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

                  In this Friday, March 21, 2014 photo, visitors celebrating the spring equinox greet the sun as it rises over the Pyramid of the Sun at the Teotihuacan archeological site, in Mexico. Although the official vernal equinox occurred on Thursday, thousands of visitors were expected to climb the ancient pyramid on Friday to greet the sun and celebrate the beginning of spring. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

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                    Of the Wari Empire El Castillo de Huarmey Tomb

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                    Peruvian Tomb Discovered: Queens’ Graves, Treasure Found Inside Ancient Mausoleum 06/27/2013  A rare, undisturbed royal tomb has been unearthed in Peru, revealing the graves of three Wari queens buried alongside gold and silver riches and possible human sacrifices. Though the surrounding site has been looted many times, this mausoleum has managed to evade grave robbers for hundreds of years, archaeologists say.

                    Two workers walk on the coastal pyramid site called El Castillo de Huarmey in Huarmey, 185 miles (299 km) north of Lima, June 27, 2013. Archaeologists in Peru on Thursday said they have unearthed a massive royal tomb full of mummified women that provides clues about the enigmatic Wari empire that ruled the Andes long before their better-known Incan successors. The mausoleum at El Castillo de Huarmey contained gold pieces, ceramics and 63 skeletons about 1,300 years old. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU)

                    Workers brush the remains of a coastal pyramid site called El Castillo de Huarmey, 185 miles (299 km) north of Lima, June 27, 2013. Archaeologists in Peru on Thursday said they have unearthed a massive royal tomb full of mummified women that provides clues about the enigmatic Wari empire that ruled the Andes long before their better-known Incan successors. The mausoleum, unearthed a few months ago contained gold pieces, ceramics and 63 skeletons about 1,300 years old. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY)

                    People work at the remains of a coastal pyramid site called El Castillo de Huarmey, 185 miles (299 km) north of Lima, June 27, 2013. Archaeologists in Peru on Thursday said they have unearthed a massive royal tomb full of mummified women that provides clues about the enigmatic Wari empire that ruled the Andes long before their better-known Incan successors. The mausoleum at El Castillo de Huarmey, which was unearthed a few months ago, contained gold pieces, ceramics and 63 skeletons about 1,300 years old. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY)

                    A worker brushes the remains of a coastal pyramid site called El Castillo de Huarmey in Huarmey, 185 miles (299 km) north of Lima, June 27, 2013. Archaeologists in Peru on Thursday said they have unearthed a massive royal tomb full of mummified women that provides clues about the enigmatic Wari empire that ruled the Andes long before their better-known Incan successors. The El Castillo de Huarmey mausoleum contained gold pieces, ceramics and 63 skeletons about 1,300 years old. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY)

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