Archive for the ‘Cherokee’ Category

Of the “U-Le-Na-Hi-Dv Tsa-La-Gi” Uplands Cherokee

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SS: the below legend talks about an island in the atlantic from whence the cherokee people came from which i think really refers to atlantis. “u-le-na-hi-dv tsa-la-gi” means lost cherokee in cherokee native tongue. there are two chiefs the white cheif during peace times and the red chief during war times. and i believe there is a third chief.. the ‘ani-kutani’ chief who comes from south america who were called the secret order of viracocha who enter and leave this world through astral windows.. the same astral windows seen in the pacific that the mer-people enter and leave through..there is the difference between a ‘secret society or fraternity’ and the ‘secret order’ .

SS: i am 1/3rd cherokee and 2/3rds german although one could not tell i am that much cherokee.. the tribe i am associated with is called the ‘lost cherokee’ of the wolf clan .. this tribe did not participate in the ‘trail of tears’ and never signed any peace treaties with the us government. what i think this means is that the secret order is not bound by any us government/native american treaties. three fourths of the cherokee nation are 1/4th blood quantum or less. today to be kituwah only requires 1/4th blood quantum.

Derived from the Cherokee term “Ani-kituhwagi” meaning “people of the Kituwah” the name Keetoowah has become synonymous with the conservative “fullblood” element of the Cherokee Nation. It is believed that the Kituwah settlement was the original nucleus of the Cherokee people in the mountains of North Carolina along the highland regions of Cherokee Homelands. Benny Smith, Cherokee Elder, agrees with this definition, “ It is highly probable that Keetoowah was derived from “go-doo”, a Cherokee word meaning on top, on the surface, or uppermost. The mother settlement of the Ancient Cherokee was called Kituwah, which is now Keetoowah, and was located in the uplands … “Go-doos” is often used to refer to the highlands in relations to the low bottomlands or prairie lands.

Although Kituwah was synonymous with the older mother towns, the story of the origins of Kituwah goes much farther back in Cherokee history. According to legend, the Cherokee people originated from an island in the Atlantic Ocean somewhere east of South America where they were continually plagued by attacks from neighboring peoples. In spite of the fact they were heavily outnumbered, the Cherokee were consistently victorious in their struggles. One enemy saw in the plume of smoke from the Cherokee encampment an eagle bearing arrows in it’s claws, became convinced that the Cherokee were the divine’s chosen people and withdrew the assault. According to the same legend, the breathgiver did indeed grant the Cherokee unlimited and mysterious powers. Their wise men were accorded the special gift of being able to interpret and act upon the breathgivers wishes.

As time passed, this ancient and mysterious clan of wise men became known as the “Ani-Kutani”. Because of their mysterious powers and control over the forces of nature, the Ani-Kutani totally controlled the religious function of the Cherokee Nation. The Ani-Kutani grew to be a clan among the Cherokee, as opposed to a society, because their power and position had become hereditary. As the powers granted to the Ani-Kutani were granted by special dispensation from the divine breathgiver, they were only to be used for the best interests of the people. Pg 74 – 75 n Slavery in the Cherokee Nation n By Patrick Neal Minges

Viracocha is the great creator god in the pre-Inca and Inca mythology in the Andes region of South America. Full name and some spelling alternatives are Wiracocha,[1] Apu Qun Tiqsi Wiraqutra, and Con-Tici (also spelled Kon-Tiki) Viracocha. Viracocha was one of the most important deities in the Inca pantheon and seen as the creator of all things, or the substance from which all things are created, and intimately associated with the sea.[2] Viracocha created the universe, sun, moon, and stars, time (by commanding the sun to move over the sky)[3] and civilization itself. Viracocha was worshipped as god of the sun and of storms. He was represented as wearing the sun for a crown, with thunderbolts in his hands, and tears descending from his eyes as rain.

This undated photo provided by researcher Sarah L. Anzick shows a nearly-complete projectile point, top, two mid-stage points and an “end-beveled” rod of bone from a Clovis-era burial site found in 1968 in western Montana. Scientists have recovered and analyzed the DNA of an infant who died more than 12,000 years ago and was buried at the site where these artifacts were found. By comparing the boy’s genome to those of present-day people, the research showed that many of today’s Native Americans are direct descendants of the population the boy belonged to, and that he is closely related to all indigenous American populations, especially in Central and South America, the researchers said. The DNA analysis was reported online Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014 in the journal Nature. (AP Photo/Sarah L. Anzick)

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    Of the Snowey Owl Arctic Wolf Spirit Animals

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    Stunning black and white portraits of exotic zoo creatures Snowy owl. (AlexTeuscher/BNPS)

    Stunning black and white images of zoo animals Arctic Wolf. (AlexTeuscher/BNPS)

    Aniwaya This is the “Wolf Clan”.[6] The Aniwaya, or Wolf Clan, has been known throughout time to be the largest clan. During the time of the Peace Chief and War Chief government setting, the War Chief would come from this clan. Wolves are known as protectors. Historically, the Wolf Clan was the largest and most important among the Cherokee.[9]

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      Of the Cherokee Wolf Pack

      In this Oct. 6, 2011 photo, a red wolf runs at the Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, N.Y. The Wolf Conservation Center is raising and breeding endangered Mexican and red wolves. The animals roam in large pens on the 27-acre property, eating roadkill and whatever they catch. The center is an important part of the effort to return wolves to the wild in North Carolina, Arizona and New Mexico. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

      In this Oct. 6, 2011 photo, a Mexican wolf sits on the ground at the Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, N.Y. The Wolf Conservation Center is raising and breeding endangered Mexican and red wolves. The animals roam in large pens on the 27-acre property, eating roadkill and whatever they catch. The center is an important part of the effort to return wolves to the wild in North Carolina, Arizona and New Mexico. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

      In this Oct. 6, 2011 photo, Alawa, a Rocky Mountain wolf, walks through the grass at the Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, N.Y. The Wolf Conservation Center is raising and breeding endangered Mexican and red wolves. The animals roam in large pens on the 27-acre property, eating roadkill and whatever they catch. The center is an important part of the effort to return wolves to the wild in North Carolina, Arizona and New Mexico. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

      In this Oct. 6, 2011 photo, a breeding pair of Mexican wolves look around their enclosure at the Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, N.Y. The Wolf Conservation Center is raising and breeding endangered Mexican and red wolves. The animals roam in large pens on the 27-acre property, eating roadkill and whatever they catch. The center is an important part of the effort to return wolves to the wild in North Carolina, Arizona and New Mexico. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

      In this Oct. 6, 2011 photo, red wolves walk around their enclosure at the Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, N.Y. The Wolf Conservation Center is raising and breeding endangered Mexican and red wolves. The animals roam in large pens on the 27-acre property, eating roadkill and whatever they catch. The center is an important part of the effort to return wolves to the wild in North Carolina, Arizona and New Mexico. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

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