08-13-15champ-of-el-ninos

08-13-15el-nino-pdo-flip1

astral-etheric-tunnel

SS: according to Bill Patzert, NASA JPL there is an oscillation in the Pacific Ocean that controls the worlds weather .. the 1997-98 super el nino caused this oscillation called the PDO to flip from hot to cold which has brought much less rainfall to california and parts of the usa.. lake mead was at its fullest during the 97-98 super el nino and has shrank ever since. the new super el nino that Bill Patzert calls the “champ of super el nino’s” could flip the pdo back to warm and possibly end the california drought. obviously that is what we in the western and southwestern usa hope. other parts of the world might not like this change as well as we would.

SS: the 97-86 super el nino happened right after the great comet hale-bopp made it’s passage over the north pole of the sun.. prior to hale-bopp the great comet hyakutake made a passage over the north pole of the earth.. the point is that the pdo flipped with the 97-98 super el nino that followed these two great comets north pole passages. the 2015-16 super el nino has been proceeded by the Q1 Panstarrs comet that recently brightened in the Beehive Crown next to the moon. it is possible that another comet might brighten just as the 2015-16 el nino hits this winter.

SS: regardless.. the pacific ocean waters are nice and warm right now off the coast of california! if there was a time to be at the beach in southern california now is that time.. although, it might be possible that you might encounter some marine life beaching themselves or other phenomena caused by the warming el nino waters. in june 2015 small red crabs were beaching themselves.. the last time that happened was months before the great indonesian earthquake and tsunami. i saw several of these red crabs myself when i was in malibu in southern california in june, and the water was warm then.

The great El Niño of 1997-98, and what it means for the winter to come August 22, 2015 A few weeks later, rain started hitting Orange County. Then, in December, in the course of just 24 hours, the skies opened up over Orange County in what meteorologists described then as the wettest, most intense single-day deluge in more than a century. More than 7 inches fell in parts of south Orange County in one day. Mobile home parks in Huntington Beach flooded. Rescuers were forced to use inflatable boats and a catamaran to scoop up residents. Mudslides destroyed hillside homes. Major roads were made impassable by debris. And that was just the beginning. El Niño-fueled rains began striking Los Angeles in January and intensified. Over the next few months, a relentless string of storms caused havoc, washing away roads and railroad tracks, overflowing flood control channels, causing 17 deaths and more than half a billion dollars in damage in California. The toll was far worse in Mexico, where Tijuana and other cities faced crippling flooding. The importance of the storms of 1997-98 is now coming into focus as scientists expect the latest El Niño to strengthen and hit Southern California with a vengeance.

Thousands of tiny red crabs invade Southern California beaches June 15, 2015 Thousands of red tuna crabs washed onto Southern California beaches Sunday, repeating a phenomenon experts say occurs with warmer ocean temperatures. The critters have beached before in Newport Beach and Laguna Beach but Sunday’s activity in Huntington Beach stood out, said Marine Safety Lt. Michael Beuerlein. He said he hadn’t seen a similar occurrence in his 34 years with the city.

NASA | Scientists Link Earlier Melting Of Snow To Dark Aerosols Published on Jul 21, 2015 Tiny particles suspended in the air, known as aerosols, can darken snow and ice causing it to absorb more of the sun’s energy. But until recently, scientists rarely considered the effect of all three major types of light-absorbing aerosols together in climate models.

Pollution in Northern Hemisphere helped cause 1980s African drought June 6, 2013 Decades of drought in central Africa reached their worst point in the 1980s, causing Lake Chad, a shallow lake used to water crops in neighboring countries, to almost dry out completely. The shrinking lake and prolonged drought were initially blamed on overgrazing and bad agricultural practices. More recently, Lake Chad became an example of global warming. New University of Washington research, to be published in Geophysical Research Letters, shows that the drought was caused at least in part by Northern Hemisphere air pollution. Aerosols emanating from coal-burning factories in the United States and Europe during the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s cooled the entire Northern Hemisphere, shifting tropical rain bands south. Rains no longer reached the Sahel region, a band that spans the African continent just below the Sahara desert.

Flood or drought: how do aerosols affect precipitation? Aerosols serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus have a substantial effect on cloud properties and the initiation of precipitation. Large concentrations of human-made aerosols have been reported to both decrease and increase rainfall as a result of their radiative and CCN activities.

Slide One: “the champ of super el ninos” (Bill Patzert, NASA JPL)

Slide two: “1997 super el nino flipped the pdo back to cold mode in 1998″ (Bill Patzert, NASA JPL)

Hoover Dam: “the last time lake meade was at its fullest was during the 1997-98 super el nino” (Bill Patzert, NASA JPL)

In this Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015 photo provided by XL Catlin Seaview Survey, coral reef is shown in Kaneohe Bay off the east coast of Oahu, Hawaii. Abnormally warm water caused by a powerful El Nino pattern is heating up the Pacific Ocean to the point that coral reefs in the waters off Hawaii have already begun to show signs of coral bleaching. The Seaview Survey team and a crew of scientists were in Kaneohe Bay Thursday to photograph coral as it begins to bleach, hoping to provide a baseline image of the reef before more serious bleaching occurs. The images they create will also be uploaded to Google’s Street View to offer the public a peek inside a normally unseen world. (XL Catlin Seaview Survey via AP)

In this Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015 photo provided by XL Catlin Seaview Survey, a bleached coral is shown in Kaneohe Bay off the east coast of Oahu, Hawaii. Abnormally warm water caused by a powerful El Nino pattern is heating up the Pacific Ocean to the point that coral reefs in the waters off Hawaii have already begun to show signs of coral bleaching. The Seaview Survey team and a crew of scientists were in Kaneohe Bay Thursday to photograph coral as it begins to bleach, hoping to provide a baseline image of the reef before more serious bleaching occurs. The images they create will also be uploaded to Google’s Street View to offer the public a peek inside a normally unseen world. (XL Catlin Seaview Survey via AP)

In this Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015 photo provided by XL Catlin Seaview Survey, a bleached coral reef is shown in Kaneohe Bay off the east coast of Oahu, Hawaii. Abnormally warm water caused by a powerful El Nino pattern is heating up the Pacific Ocean to the point that coral reefs in the waters off Hawaii have already begun to show signs of coral bleaching. The Seaview Survey team and a crew of scientists were in Kaneohe Bay Thursday to photograph coral as it begins to bleach, hoping to provide a baseline image of the reef before more serious bleaching occurs. The images they create will also be uploaded to Google’s Street View to offer the public a peek inside a normally unseen world. (XL Catlin Seaview Survey via AP)

Hawaii-Coral Mapping

Hawaii-Coral Mapping

Hawaii-Coral Mapping