Archive for the ‘Peru’ Category

Of the Peruvian Andes White Sun

ea541c0de487c12e660f6a7067003b05

FILE- In this June 12, 2011 file photo, people walk along the Cordillera Real of the Andes mountains on the outskirts of La Paz, Bolivia. According to the Environmental Defense League, a Bolivian NGO, Bolivia’s glaciers along the Cordillera Real, Chacaltaya, Tuni Condorini and Illimani are shrinking in size by more than one meter every year and estimate that the majority of the snow in this area could disappear by 2030. A scientific assessment by the U.N.’s expert panel on climate change warned that rising global temperatures could have an irreversible impact on people and ecosystems as glaciers melt, sea levels rise, heat waves intensify and oceans become warmer and more acidic. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

A canyon cuts through the Andes mountains in Peru, Sunday, Dec. 7, 2014. The momentum from a historic U.S.-China pact to resist global warming is showing signs of fading at the U.N. climate talks in Peru, as the familiar rich-poor conflict persists over who should do what to keep the planet from overheating. Time remains to work things out as environment ministers are just starting to arrive. The conference’s high-level phase begins Tuesday. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

c550aa5909159430670f6a706700161b (1)

    Of the Pompei Valley in Huaraz, Peru Glaciers

    b427ced8990b3a2f670f6a7067009562

    1879890f987df030670f6a7067001079

    c968fef1990a3a2f670f6a706700f748

    97e64e6b99033a2f670f6a706700e035

    ad389ee0bcfd512f670f6a7067004924

    8c06764dbd02522f670f6a706700b99d (1)

    25526a77bcff512f670f6a706700d463

    The glacier Huascaran is seen in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    AP10ThingsToSee – Members of the glaciology unit of Peru’s national water authority walk on the Pastoruri glacier in Huaraz, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. The glaciology unit is studying the measurement of ice thickness. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    The Contrayerba glacier is seen in the Huascaran National Park in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    The glacier Contrayerba is seen in the Huascaran National Park in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    Members of the glaciology unit of Peru’s national water authority walk towards the Pastoruri glacier in Huaraz, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. The glaciology unit is studying the measurement of ice thickness. According to Alejo Cochachin, coordinator of the glaciology unit, the Pastoruri glacier retreated 576 meters between 1980 and 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    A member of the glaciology unit of Peru’s national water authority walks next to Pastoruri glacier after measuring its ice thickness, in Huaraz, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. According to Alejo Cochachin, coordinator of the glaciology unit, the Pastoruri glacier retreated 576 meters between 1980 and 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    Melting blocks of ice float near the Pastoruri glacier in Huaraz, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. According to Alejo Cochachin, coordinator of the glaciology unit, the Pastoruri glacier retreated 576 meters between 1980 and 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    The Vallunaraju mountain stands high in the Andes, early morning in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    Rain drops illuminated by the sun, fall over Pompei valley in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    A road winds its way through Pompei valley in Huaraz, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014. Peru’s glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peru’s 30 million people who inhabit the country’s Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    The geoglyph of the condor is seen from a plane in Nazca, Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, “Time for Change: The Future is Renewable,” which can be viewed from the sky next to the hummingbird geoglyph, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the cultural landmarks of Peru. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    The geoglyph of the austronaut is seen from a plane in Nazca, Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, “Time for Change: The Future is Renewable,” which can be viewed from the sky next to the hummingbird geoglyph, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the cultural landmarks of Peru. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    2e55b68f99093a2f670f6a7067009f6b

    3f1efb53990a3a2f670f6a70670028ec

    3cf4e5cf990b3a2f670f6a70670079d9 (1)

    80d23e7a2c51a830670f6a7067001a97 (1)

    e1ad5de92c53a830670f6a7067005d06

      Of the Great Pyramid at the Cahuachi

      2014-09-14T040951Z_56572438_GM1EA9E0XPO01_RTRMADP_3_PERU-TOURISM

      Tourists walk at the Great Pyramid at the Cahuachi Ceremonial Centre in Nazca September 13, 2014. Researchers say priests from the Cahuachi compound, built in 400 B.C., which is just across the Nazca Valley, may have designed the Nazca Lines, one of Peru’s popular tourist attractions and a UNESCO World Heritage site. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY TRAVEL)

      The Great Pyramid is seen at the Cahuachi Ceremonial Centre in Nazca September 13, 2014. Researchers say priests from the Cahuachi compound, built in 400 B.C., which is just across the Nazca Valley, may have designed the Nazca Lines, one of Peru’s popular tourist attractions and a UNESCO World Heritage site. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY TRAVEL)

      2014-09-14T040651Z_1556863568_GM1EA9E0XIC01_RTRMADP_3_PERU-TOURISM

        Of the Huaca de la Luna Jaguar Claws

        2014-07-28T192648Z_1422412412_GM1EA7T08V301_RTRMADP_3_PERU-ENVIROMENT

        2014-07-28T200728Z_296980613_GM1EA7T0B5I01_RTRMADP_3_PERU-ANIM

        The Alto Madre de Dios river, part of the Manu Biosphere Reserve, is seen from Peru’s southern Amazon region of Madre de Dios July 15, 2014. This 1.8 million hectares reserve is the largest National Park in Peru and is the home of about 1000 birds species and 200 mammals species among other animals, as reptiles and amphibians, and has one of the highest levels of biodiversity of any park in the world, with more than 200 varieties of trees found in one hectare. Picture taken July 15, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU – Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY TRAVEL)

        A Jaguar is seen at the Manu National Park in Peru’s southern Amazon region of Madre de Dios July 16, 2014. This 1.8 million hectares reserve is the largest National Park in Peru and is the home of about 1000 birds species and 200 mammals species among other animals, as reptiles and amphibians, and has one of the highest levels of biodiversity of any park in the world, with more than 200 varieties of trees found in one hectare. Picture taken July 16, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU – Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS SOCIETY TRAVEL)

        An archaeologist shows a pair of metal claws found at a tomb from the Moche culture recently excavated at the Huaca de la Luna archaeological site in the city of Trujillo, July 10, 2014. Archaeologists in northern Peru have unearthed a pre-Incan tomb of a nobleman from the mysterious Moche civilisation that could be 1,500 years old, shedding new light on the ancient culture, according to archaeologist Santiago Uceda, director of the archaeological site. Picture taken July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Luis Alvitres (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY)

        2014-07-12T005424Z_1053736856_GM2EA7C0OCI01_RTRMADP_3_PERU

          Of the Peruvian Ubinas Volcano Eruption

          09-04-13ubinas_eruption01

          09-04-13ubinas_eruption02a

          1378277403850_454_21ynRS64HRgq1_0_0

          Peru: Ubinas Volcano erupts for fifth time in two days September 3, 2013 He said that the explosions are probably being caused by one of two things: either the eruptions are phreatic, caused by precipitation buildup causing pressure inside the volcano, or they are caused by an “eruptive process generated by rising magma.”

          Scientists documenting Peru’s Ubinas volcano are sent scrambling as the crater begins spewing ash. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). (Reuters Screengrab)

          In this July 2, 2013 photo, children get out of the sea at the end of a surfing lesson in Lima, Peru. For roughly four months a year, the sun abandons Peru’s seaside desert capital, suffocating it under a ponderous gray cloudbank and fog that coats the city with nighttime drizzles. The cold Humboldt current that runs north from Antarctica along the coast is the culprit, colliding with the warmer tropical atmosphere to create the blinding mists called “garua” in coastal Chile and Peru. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

          9c7559eb85a29b1b3a0f6a706700c6a0

            Of the Peruvian Huachipa White Bengal Tiger Cub

            2013-08-05T202937Z_878319697_GM1E9860C9S01_RTRMADP_3_PERU

            A white Bengal tiger cub plays with a journalist during a press presentation at Huachipa’s private zoo in Lima August 5, 2013. The 41-day-old, yet unnamed cub was born at the park and is the first white Bengal tiger in Peru to have been born in captivity. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU – Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)

            A white Bengal tiger cub is fed by veterinarian Catalina Hermoza during a press presentation at Huachipa’s private zoo in Lima August 5, 2013. The 41-day-old, yet unnamed cub was born at the park and is the first white Bengal tiger in Peru to have been born in captivity. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU – Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)

            A white Bengal tiger cub plays with a cameraman during a press presentation at Huachipa’s private zoo in Lima August 5, 2013. The 41-day-old, yet unnamed cub was born at the park and is the first white Bengal tiger in Peru to have been born in captivity. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU – Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)

            2013-08-05T212048Z_1866958851_GM1E9860EO901_RTRMADP_3_PERU

            2013-08-05T203247Z_588478089_GM1E9860CI101_RTRMADP_3_PERU

              Of the Wari Empire El Castillo de Huarmey Tomb

              2013-06-28T002058Z_94821387_GM1E96S0MWM01_RTRMADP_3_PERU-ARCHEOLOGY-TOMBS

              Peruvian Tomb Discovered: Queens’ Graves, Treasure Found Inside Ancient Mausoleum 06/27/2013  A rare, undisturbed royal tomb has been unearthed in Peru, revealing the graves of three Wari queens buried alongside gold and silver riches and possible human sacrifices. Though the surrounding site has been looted many times, this mausoleum has managed to evade grave robbers for hundreds of years, archaeologists say.

              Two workers walk on the coastal pyramid site called El Castillo de Huarmey in Huarmey, 185 miles (299 km) north of Lima, June 27, 2013. Archaeologists in Peru on Thursday said they have unearthed a massive royal tomb full of mummified women that provides clues about the enigmatic Wari empire that ruled the Andes long before their better-known Incan successors. The mausoleum at El Castillo de Huarmey contained gold pieces, ceramics and 63 skeletons about 1,300 years old. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU)

              Workers brush the remains of a coastal pyramid site called El Castillo de Huarmey, 185 miles (299 km) north of Lima, June 27, 2013. Archaeologists in Peru on Thursday said they have unearthed a massive royal tomb full of mummified women that provides clues about the enigmatic Wari empire that ruled the Andes long before their better-known Incan successors. The mausoleum, unearthed a few months ago contained gold pieces, ceramics and 63 skeletons about 1,300 years old. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY)

              People work at the remains of a coastal pyramid site called El Castillo de Huarmey, 185 miles (299 km) north of Lima, June 27, 2013. Archaeologists in Peru on Thursday said they have unearthed a massive royal tomb full of mummified women that provides clues about the enigmatic Wari empire that ruled the Andes long before their better-known Incan successors. The mausoleum at El Castillo de Huarmey, which was unearthed a few months ago, contained gold pieces, ceramics and 63 skeletons about 1,300 years old. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY)

              A worker brushes the remains of a coastal pyramid site called El Castillo de Huarmey in Huarmey, 185 miles (299 km) north of Lima, June 27, 2013. Archaeologists in Peru on Thursday said they have unearthed a massive royal tomb full of mummified women that provides clues about the enigmatic Wari empire that ruled the Andes long before their better-known Incan successors. The El Castillo de Huarmey mausoleum contained gold pieces, ceramics and 63 skeletons about 1,300 years old. REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY)

              2013-06-27T234917Z_249222856_GM1E96S0LLY01_RTRMADP_3_PERU-ARCHAEOLOGY-TOMB

              2013-06-28T021813Z_1359995932_GM1E96S0SEV01_RTRMADP_3_PERU-ARCHEOLOGY-TOMBS

              2013-06-28T001849Z_562912751_GM1E96S0MWF01_RTRMADP_3_PERU-ARCHEOLOGY-TOMBS

                Of the Andean Cusco Maras Salt Mines

                Pools of salt are seen at the Maras mines in Cuzco August 29, 2012. The Maras mines have been a source of salt since ancient pre-Incan civilizations, and currently comprise of approximately 3,000 small pools constructed on the slope of a mountain at the Urubamba Valley in the Andean region of Cuzco. REUTERS/Janine Costa (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY)

                A worker collects salt in a pool of salt at the Maras mines in Cuzco August 29, 2012. The Maras mines have been a source of salt since ancient pre-Incan civilizations and nowadays comprise about 3,000 small pools constructed on the slope of a mountain at the Urubamba valley in the Andean region of Cuzco. REUTERS/Janine Costa (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY)

                A worker carries a bag of salt through pools of salt at the Maras mines in Cuzco August 29, 2012. The Maras mines have been a source of salt since ancient pre-Incan civilizations and nowadays comprise about 3,000 small pools constructed on the slope of a mountain at the Urubamba valley in the Andean region of Cuzco. REUTERS/Janine Costa (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY)

                  Of the Chocolate Lord of Sipan

                  The town of Sipán, in the Zaña district, is roughly around 20 miles east of the city of Chiclayo and 45–50 miles away from Lambayeque. The site belonged to the Moche (Mochican) culture that mainly worshipped the god called Ai Apaec (Ayapec) as “principal” god or deity.

                  A chocolate replica of Incan citadel Machu Picchu, made out of 250 pounds of Peruvian cocoa, is displayed during a chocolate convention in Lima July 5, 2012. The five-day exhibition, which drew distributors from Latin America and chocolate sommeliers from Europe, featured organic dark chocolate candy bars, chocolate sushi and Machu Picchu and Lord of Sipan sculptures carved out of chocolate. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS)

                  People look at a chocolate replica of the Lord of Sipan, made with Peruvian cocoa, during a chocolate convention in Lima July 5, 2012. The five-day exhibition, which drew distributors from Latin America and chocolate sommeliers from Europe, featured organic dark chocolate candy bars, chocolate sushi and Machu Picchu and Lord of Sipan sculptures carved out of chocolate. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS)

                  A creation made out of chocolate is displayed during a chocolate convention in Lima July 5, 2012. The five-day exhibition, which drew distributors from Latin America and chocolate sommeliers from Europe, featured organic dark chocolate candy bars, chocolate sushi and Machu Picchu and Lord of Sipan sculptures carved out of chocolate. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS)

                  Chocolates are displayed during a chocolate convention in Lima July 5, 2012. The five-day exhibition, which drew distributors from Latin America and chocolate sommeliers from Europe, featured organic dark chocolate candy bars, chocolate sushi and Machu Picchu and Lord of Sipan sculptures carved out of chocolate. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU – Tags: SOCIETY FOOD BUSINESS)

                  .

                    Of the Peruvian Bird Dung Farms

                    Thousands of Guanay Cormorant birds fly over and nest on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 10, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world’s finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 10, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU – Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)

                    Boobies nest on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world’s finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU – Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)

                    Workers scrap stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world’s finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU – Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)

                    A worker pushes a wheelbarrow to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 11, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world’s finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the XIX century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 11, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU – Tags: ANIMALS AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)

                    Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world’s finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the XIX century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU – Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE SOCIETY)

                    Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world’s finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the XIX century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU – Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS AGRICULTURE TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

                    Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world’s finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU – Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)

                    Workers collect bird dung on a field in Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, like the other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, is home to nearly 4 million migratory birds such as guanays, boobies and pelicans whose excrement make up the world’s finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource being exported to the United States, England and France. With a current annual production of 20 thousand tons, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers by boosting organic agriculture, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program (Agrorural) reported. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU – Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS POLITICS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)

                      Return top

                      Silver Star

                      Photobucket